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New Releases and Upcoming Movies

New & Upcoming Movie Releases


Ted 2
Release: June 26th
Rated: TBD
Cast: Liam Neeson, Mark Wahlberg, Amanda Seyfried
Genre: Comedy
Synopsis: Newlywed couple Ted and Tami-Lynn want to have a baby, but in order to qualify to be a parent, Ted will have to prove he's a person in a court of law.
Magic Mike XXL
Release: July 1st
Rated: R
Cast: Elizabeth Banks, Channing Tatum, Amber Heard
Genre: Comedy | Drama | Music 
Synopsis: Three years after Mike bowed out of the stripper life at the top of his game, he and the remaining Kings of Tampa hit the road to Myrtle Beach to put on one last blow-out performance.
Terminator Genisys
Release: July 1st
Rated: TBD
Cast: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Emilia Clarke, Jai Courtney
Genre: Action | Adventure | Sci-Fi
Synopsis: After finding himself in a new time-line, Kyle Reese teams up with John Connor's mother Sarah and an aging terminator to try and stop the one thing that the future fears, "Judgement Day".
Self/less
Release: July 10th
Rated: PG-13
Cast:  Ryan Reynolds, Matthew Goode, Ben Kingsley
Genre: Sci-Fi | Thriller
Synopsis: An extremely wealthy man, dying from cancer, undergoes a radical medical procedure that transfers his consciousness into the body of a healthy young man. But all is not as it seems when he starts to uncover the mystery of the body's origin and the organization that will kill to protect its cause.
The Gallows
Release: July 10th
Rated: TBD
Cast: Cassidy Gifford, Pfeifer Brown, Ryan Shoos
Genre: Horror | Thriller
Synopsis: 20 years after a horrific accident during a small town school play, students at the school resurrect the failed show in a misguided attempt to honor the anniversary of the tragedy - but soon discover that some things are better left alone.
Minions
Release: July 10th
Rated: PG
Cast: Chris Renaud, Pierre Coffin, Sandra Bullock
Genre: Animation, Comedy, Family  
Synopsis: Minions Stuart, Kevin and Bob are recruited by Scarlet Overkill, a super-villain who, alongside her inventor husband Herb, hatches a plot to take over the world.
Mr. Holmes
Release: July 17th
Rated: PG
Cast: Ian McKellen, Laura Linney, Hiroyuki Sanada
Genre: Crime | Drama | Mystery
Synopsis: An aged, retired Sherlock Holmes looks back on his life, and grapples with an unsolved case involving a beautiful woman.
Irrational Man
Release: July 17th
Rated: R
Cast: Emma Stone, Joaquin Phoenix, Parker Posey
Genre: Mystery
Synopsis: A tormented philosophy professor finds a will to live when he commits an existential act.
Trainwreck
Release: July 17th
Rated: R
Cast: Amy Schumer, Bill Hader, Brie Larson
Genre: Comedy
Synopsis: Having thought that monogamy was never possible, a commitment-phobic career woman may have to face her fears when she meets a good guy.
Ant-Man
Release: July 17th
Rated: TBD
Cast: Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lilly, Hayley Atwell
Genre: Actrion | Sci-Fi
Synopsis: Armed with a super-suit with the astonishing ability to shrink in scale but increase in strength, con-man Scott Lang must embrace his inner hero and help his mentor, Dr. Hank Pym, plan and pull off a heist that will save the world.
The Vatican Tapes
Release: July 24th
Rated: PG-13
Cast: Kathleen Robertson, Djimon Hounsou, Dougray Scott 
Genre: Horror | Thriller
Synopsis: A priest and two Vatican exorcists must do battle with an ancient satanic force to save the soul of a young woman.
Paper Towns
Release: July 24th
Rated: TBD
Cast: Cara Delevingne, Nat Wolff, Halston Sage
Genre: Drama | Mystery | Romance 
Synopsis: A young man and his friends embark upon the road trip of their lives to find the missing girl next door.
Pixels
Release: July 24th
Rated: PG-13
Cast: Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Michelle Monaghan
Genre: Action | Comedy
Synopsis: When aliens misinterpret video feeds of classic arcade games as a declaration of war, they attack the Earth in the form of the video games.
Ricki and the Flash
Release: August 7th
Rated: TBD
Cast: Sebastian Stan, Meryl Streep, Ben Platt
Genre: Comedy | Drama | Music
Synopsis: A musician who gave up everything for her dream of rock-and-roll stardom returns home, looking to make things right with her family.
Fantastic Four
Release: August 7th
Rated: TBD
Cast: Miles Teller, Kate Mara, Michael B. Jordan
Genre: Action | Adventure | Sci-Fi
Synopsis: Four young outsiders teleport to an alternate and dangerous universe which alters their physical form in shocking ways. The four must learn to harness their new abilities and work together to save Earth from a former friend turned enemy.
Masterminds
Release: August 19th
Rated: TBD
Cast: Kristen Wiig, Owen Wilson, Zach Galifianakis
Genre: Action | Comedy | Crime
Synopsis: A night guard at an armored car company in the Southern U.S. organizes one of the biggest bank heists in American history.
Sinister 2
Release: August 21st
Rated: R
Cast: Shannyn Sossamon, James Ransone, Nicholas King
Genre: Horror
Synopsis: A young mother and her twin sons move into a rural house that's marked for death.
No Escape
Release: September 2nd
Rated: TBD
Cast: Lake Bell, Pierce Brosnan, Owen Wilson
Genre: Action | Thriller
Synopsis: In their new overseas home, an American family soon finds themselves caught in the middle of a coup, and they frantically look for a safe escape in an environment where foreigners are being immediately executed.
A Walk in the Woods
Release: September 2nd
Rated: TBD
Cast: Nick Offerman, Kristen Schaal, Mary Steenburgen
Genre: Adventure | Comedy | Drama
Synopsis: After spending two decades in England, Bill Bryson returns to the U.S., where he decides the best way to connect with his homeland is to hike the Appalachian Trail with one of his oldest friends.


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Ted 2
Seth MacFarlane said recently in a New York Times interview that he had a completely different plot for Ted 2 originally.  The first plot involved Ted and John driving a pot shipment across the country and hijinks would ensue.  Well, in 2013 an absolutely awful movie with Jennifer Aniston came out called We're the Millers and was basically the exact same plot.  MacFarlane then scrapped his Ted 2 plot and thought of something else.  Luckily, he was reading a book about the Civil War at the time and was inspired by the true story of Dred Scott.  See, Scott was a slave who sued to prove that he was a person and not property.  Only someone like MacFarlane could take such an inspiring, tragic and emotional true story and apply it to something as stupid as a teddy bear suing for the same reason.  Even though the plot we got sounds infinitely more interesting than his original one, it's proof that this sequel was a completely unnecessary Hollywood money grab that never needed to be made in the first place. The one thing you need to give MacFarlane is that he knows what he finds funny and doesn't really give a damn what you find funny.  Luckily for most of us, we find funny what he finds funny; that's the reason why Ted was such a relatively critical and commercial success.  He made a story that was already ridiculous and added his own style of absurdity to it to make it a uniquely weird and wonderful comedy.  In Ted 2, he tries to do the same level of weirdness but it doesn't coexist with the plot as well as the first one.  The stakes are pretty high in Ted 2 and the lack of care and professionalism taken by all the main characters doesn't sit right, even in the context of the film. Don't get me wrong; Ted 2 has some really, really funny moments.  You have to wait through long periods of agenda and statement-making drawing parallels to the civil rights fight going on today with gay and lesbian Americans though.  I appreciate that MacFarlane is trying to juggle a lot with this film but there are large stretches of time in the already two-hour-long movie where nothing funny happens at all.  It's like watching a boxing match where the fighters spend a majority of the time dancing around each other but you'll still watch it because just as you're zoning out there are really exciting blows. None of this was the fault of stars Mark Wahlberg, Amanda Seyfried (Les Miserables, A Million Ways to Die in the West) or MacFarlane, who voices Ted as well.  Wahlberg and MacFarlane have the same level of chemistry as they did in the first one and it's just another reminder of how funny Wahlberg can be.  The problem simply falls on a script that doesn't shine as bright nor feel as fresh as the first one.  MacFarlane, as a director, probably knew this as well, which might explain why he lets the movie go on for an extra 20-30 minutes that should've been cut.  That also might be why MacFarlane uses so many cameos in the film, since cameos often perk up sleepy people up in an otherwise soggy screening. I'm still a fan of MacFarlane and appreciate what he does.  I think what we're seeing with Ted 2 and his last film, A Million Ways to Die in the West, is that he's surrounded with a tad too many "yes" people who tell him everything he does it great.  Or even worse, he's surrounded by no one and relies only on his own ego to tell him he's great.  Either way, we're starting to see an artist of comedy grow tired in his own specific style.  I'm still hoping that's not true and want him to make something that changes the landscape like Family Guy did when it burst onto the scene 18 years ago (yeah...that should make you feel old).  Some could see Ted 2 as the beginning of the end but it has enough uppercuts and body blows that I'll still watch whatever fight he wants to put on.
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Inside Out
Becoming a parent does crazy things to your brain.  Things that you never thought about or, if you did, didn't care about on an emotional level suddenly become the thoughts that will knock the knees out from under you.  One of those thoughts is growing up and I don't mean growing old.  That's different.  Growing up was always something that kids looked forward to and every new milestone was exciting.  When you're a parent though, you look at each of those milestones as a small tragedy that you still are excited to celebrate.  Watching your child slowly drift through each phase of childhood development makes every parent feel nostalgic for the days before it happened.  The creators of Inside Out knew that and harnessed it into a film that not only works as a delightful celebration of the sadness that brings them but also a thrilling, colorful adventure that children will want to watch over and over again. Yes, it's true that Pixar hasn't been the juggernaut it was since 2010's Toy Story 3, which I still say is the greatest children's film of all time.  Cars 2 and Brave were both terrible and even though I loved Monsters University, it was panned by critics and didn't make a ton of money.  Inside Out is not only a return to the creative genius we all grew to expect from Pixar but it's one of their best films they've ever made.  Part of that reason is because they got Peter Doctor to direct it.  He's the wizard behind Up and Monsters Inc.  Both of those films carry with them, not just crowning achievements in films for children, but in films in general.  Up showed how an entire life can be displayed in ten minutes without saying a word and Monsters Inc. still has one of the greatest endings in any movie ever.  As good as both those films are, Inside Out is better. The movie follows the five primary emotions that exist in all of our brains.  Inside Out shows them as colorful, hilarious characters that have all been perfectly cast.  Amy Poehler is Joy, Phyillis Smith (NBC's The Office, Bad Teacher) is Sadness, Lewis Black (Comedy Central's The Daily Show, Unaccompanied Minors) is Anger, Bill Hader (The Skeleton Twins, Superbad) is Fear, and Mindy Kaling (NBC's The Office, The Five-Year Engagement) is Disgust.  If you're a comedy nerd or a fan of quality sitcoms, you know all of these people already and realize what an absolute perfect casting all of them were.   What makes this go further than just seeing these wacky emotions interact is the plot, where the 11-year-old girl they exist inside of moves to a new city, has to make new friends, deal with stress from her parents' relationship at home all while she's starting to enter puberty.  These changes lead to an adventure that kids will love but play out the emotional transition from child to teen that will tear the heart out of parents.  Children won't understand why you're crying to see certain characters appear and then disappear and they may wonder why you're crying behind your 3D glasses but any parent who values the innocence their child possess or no longer has will see certain scenes play out and they will strike a memory that may break their hearts. Even if you don't have kids, Inside Out will still attack your feels.  Everyone had an imaginary friend or pretended a stick was something magical.  We can all relate to middle school and how those were the years where happiness was no longer found at every minute but instead sadness started to creep in.  Inside Out doesn't play this out to depress you but instead shows you why it's important to allow some sadness in your life because it's part of what makes memories and events so important.  What's a real amazing accomplishment is that Doctor achieves all of this while also making a thrilling, funny adventure for kids.  It's the same film that operates on two levels, each totally satisfying for adults and children. I know I've made Inside Out seem like it's a rather heartbreaking film for anyone over the age of 21; it's not.  I absolutely love the first ten minutes of Up but, let's face it, it's not something you want to subject yourself to over and over again.  Inside Out is something you want to enjoy many times over.  It's a masterpiece that will carry new meaning to its viewers every new decade they watch it.  Instead of making you depressed, it forces you to recognize the majesty of youth and want to cling to it either in yourself or your kids as hard and as long as you can.  It's a film that will be enjoyed for generations because it's meant to be absorbed differently for generations.  I'm not sure what else you can expect and hope for out of a film outside of that.
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Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
There have only been a few movies in the last ten years or so that have made me cry.  Don't get me wrong; I'm not someone who doesn't cry often when watching a sad film.  What usually happens, however, is I'll get wet eyes and perhaps a single tear will roll down my cheek.  When I say that a movie made me cry, I mean ugly, sobbing cry.  Many tears.  A little snot.  Quivering chin and lip.  Ugly.  Me and Early and the Dying Girl made me do that and I was not expecting it at all.  I heard that it was the darling of Sundance and swept everyone off their feet but they were mostly talking about how funny it was, how real the characters feel and how its look is so fresh.  All that is true but it's also a suckerpunch to the feels that you won't soon forget. Director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon may only have a few television episodes of American Horror Story and Glee along with a lousy remake of The Town the Dreaded Sundown to his credit but he's worked as Assistant Director under some of the greatest filmmakers of all time.  (Listen to my interview with Jon Bernthal below to hear them listed)  Those jobs working with the masters are what prepared him to make Dying Girl a truly fresh vision.  Much like how Jason Reitman made Juno feel like something new and exciting back in 2007, Gomez-Rejon does it with this.  The dialogue is hilarious and real, the characters are fully fleshed out and the setting of Pittsburgh, PA is absolutely captured depressingly gorgeous.  He's someone to make note of because I believe we'll see a lot of him in the coming years. We'll also see a lot of the entire young cast.  Thomas Mann (Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters, Project X) is wonderful as Greg, a teenager who's mom forces him to spend time with a classmate who's diagnosed with leukemia.  The dying girl is Rachel, played by Olivia Cooke (Ouija, The Quiet Ones).  She impressively pulls off a character that balances the sadness of her mortality and the carefree joy of youth throughout the movie.  And Earl is played by RJ Cyler, who's never done anything before but you can't tell for a second.  (Listen to my interview with all three below)  He steals many scenes with a single line and has a natural way about his performance that feels like a security blanket.  All of them share a chemistry that's rare in films about teens; you get the sense that they all are real friends, which makes the film that much more hilarious and tragic. Jesse Andrews wrote the script and it's based on his book.  He's the architect for what is one of the most accurate depictions of the selfishness, apathy and turmoil that comes with being a teenager since JD Salinger wrote The Catcher in the Rye.  The main character, Greg, is someone you drift in and out of identifying with, hating, laughing at, laughing with and sharing regret with all in the 105 minute running time, which does feel a little long toward the end.  Most of Dying Girl is funny, in fact; not just funny but one of the funniest films of the year.  And without feeling like it gives you whiplash, it effortlessly slides into one of the most tragic as well.  In the regards of crafting a true dramedy, it's a masterpiece. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl isn't heavy-handed and can still be considered a fun night at the movies.  It's a film that is a tribute to cinema and the teenage human spirit.  I'm not sure if it'll have the same effect on everyone that it had one me but when the final credits rolled, it made me want to rush home and hug my loved ones a little tighter.  It's easy to make a heartbreaker about an adorable kid who dies.  That's not what this does.  It is a movie that celebrates youth and everything that comes with it...the laughs, the friendships, the school politics, the weird parents and sometimes the loss. Listen to Gavin's conversation with the cast of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl:   Listen to Gavin's conversation with actor Jon Bernthal:   Enter to win a Blu-ray copy of CHAPPiE here!
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Dope
Sundance is a funny place.  I've never been but how I've heard it described by those who have is it's a lot of rich people and filmmakers mixing and mingling hoping to be there for when the "next big thing" pops.  There is an awful lot of "did you like that?" "Of course, I did...right?"  "Oh, absolutely!  Everyone loves it."  Certain films catch the word-of-mouth and get whispered loudly through the festival and onto the pages of entertainment websites and magazines.  Sometimes those movies are brilliant and go on to launch careers, win awards, create new genres and inspire a new legion of movie wizards.  Other times, they suck.  Just flat out, old fashioned suck.  Dope is one of those movies that sucks. If you hop on Rotten Tomatoes, you'll see Dope sitting there with a 95% (at the time of writing this) and glowing reviews from top critics...almost all of which are white.  The reason I'm pointing their race out is because Dope is the kind of movie that feels so alien to so many white people that saying they didn't like it carries with it a fear of sounding racist.  It's not.  A film about teenagers living in the roughest parts of LA who get pulled into a world of drugs and crime is not something new nor is it something white people can't relate to.  Boyz in the Hood is a profoundly excellent film that was accessible to so many types of people.  Dope is a disjointed mess that can't seem to figure out if it's a comedy, a drama, a statement piece and certainly can't pull off all three. Writer/Director Rick Famuyiwa (Brown Sugar, Our Family Wedding) goes against the type of films he's made in his entire career and attempts to make a hip, young indie film that evokes filmmakers like Wes Anderson, Jared Hess, Noah Baumbach, Tarantino and even the Coen Brothers.  It's a noble attempt but a massive failure in that respect.  It starts as a fun, quirky, colorful film and then splinters off in so many different directions it loses the little momentum it builds.  That's just the directing; the writing is just as bad.  Dope is about three inner city teenagers who claim to be "nerds" and "geeks" but they're far from it; they're hipsters and that's only because they embrace "white interests."  It's actually too bad that Famuyiwa didn't make them true nerds because it would've made the story more interesting. I don't think that movies need to have a moral purpose but Dope is one that wears one all over its face.  The end of the film features a completely out-of-place monologue by star Shameik Moore (Joyful Noise), breaking the fourth wall, and tries to make an important statement about race and how it relates to teens trying to go to college.  A film about just that would be great but doing that after we spend a punishing two hours watching him succeed by shirking guilt until he eventually sells drugs and blackmails a kingpin seems morally conflicted.  Moore is joined by friends played by Kiersey Clemons (Disney Channel's Austin & Ally) and Tony Revolori (The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Perfect Game) and the three seem to do the best they could with the confusing script that was provided but just end up getting in the way of the already scattered plot. Once again, I need to point out that me "not getting it" has nothing to do with the fact that it's about a world I have no experience with.  Besides Boyz in the Hood, other films that have been about the same material like Menace II Society, Friday, Do the Right Thing, Training Day, Lean on Me, 187, Kids...all of these worked because they were accessible.  Dope was a noble try to be something funny, tragic and important told by a director who couldn't handle such a multi-tonal project.  What you're left with is a film that isn't funny, isn't tragic and if it's important, it's certainly lost in translation.
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